Rattlesnake Strike

Friday night, we had an evening woods walk with few puppy families. Saturday was go home day for Bliss and Sailor’s 8-week-old puppies. The rattlesnake didn’t alert with a rattle. The puppy didn’t cry. No one knew anything had happened until symptoms set in. Edited to add: I found out the next week where and when the strike happened.

On the way to the vet.

On the way to the vet.

Our first thought upon discovering a pup with a swollen face was that the puppy bit a bee or was stung perhaps multiple times. Yellow jackets have been plentiful this year. We gave him Benadryl, but it didn’t help, the swelling continued. He was agitated and in a LOT of pain. Rattlesnake bite was also on our radar. One of our vets met us at the hospital in Redding, so we didn’t have to use the ER with a puppy during the at-risk period for parvovirus.

The puppy resting in Tim’s arms after pain meds.

The vet also leaned toward rattlesnake bite due to the intense pain the puppy was suffering. But without the conclusive bite marks, we would be treating symptoms with powerful drugs. We shaved part of his head but couldn’t find fang marks, only a single scrape on the head with a dry scab. It’s hot and dry this time of year, a wound will scab over quickly. This puppy wasn’t presenting like a classic bee sting so we wondered if that spot could be the envenomation point since it was very tender to the touch. We started meds and blood work. If the blood work showed nothing, it would be of no help. But if the red blood cells were changing, we’d have our proof.

The envenomation site outlined by ink dots.

While we waited on blood work, the pain didn’t ease, even on pain med. As Tim and I decided we would go ahead and treat for snake bite, the vet came in with the results of the blood work. That with microscopy analysis confirmed the telltale signs of rattlesnake envenomation.

The puppy was hospitalized and started on antivenin, more pain meds, and supportive care. We returned home and went rattlesnake hunting.

Tim with the culprit.

By 11:00 pm that night, round two of antivenin was started and we had the culprit skinned and ready for the freezer.

By 8:00 am the next morning, the puppy was feeling better. He came home last night.
Of course, the puppy had been paired with a family. We candidly discussed their options and they chose to pass on this puppy and wait for a pup from another litter.
Fast forward to this morning, the puppy now known as Fang looks much better. He feels and acts like a normal puppy. It will take a few more days for the swelling to subside. He will stay with us until healed and then be paired with a new family. He’s one tough puppy.

Kelly, one of the techs shared this image with us.

The Northern Pacific rattlesnake delivered a glancing blow with a single fang. Had it succeeded in a full-on strike, I don’t know if the 8-week-old puppy would’ve survived.

Counting our blessings.

Note:

For those who are touting the highly advertised rattlesnake vaccine, take note. That vaccine is specifically designed around the western diamondback and isn’t supported by peer-reviewed research. Our rattlesnakes are the Northern Pacific rattlesnake. Different snake, different venom. A dog still requires veterinary attention even if “vaccinated”. Antivenin treatment is necessary if heavily envenomated, period. There is no conclusive research to support those vaccines for the rattlesnakes in our area. UC Davis Veterinary Hospital doesn’t stock the vaccine.  In an NIH study of the Western Diamondback rattlesnake vaccine, within 48 hours 60% of the vaccinated subjects injected with Western diamondback venom died, 80% death rate for Northern Pacific and 100% death rate for Southern Pacific. Furthermore, an 8-week-old puppy isn’t old enough for this non-core vaccine.

His first night back home. 24 hours after the snakebite.

36 hours after the rattlesnake bite, the puppy is on the mend.

Happy Thanksgiving – Turkey Dinner Old School

Happy Thanksgiving!

Turkey dinner prep circa 1946 (American Standard ad). Now for a real throwback, turkey dinner prep 2014.

Happy New Year!

Pheasant parmesan for dinner after a bountiful day in the field. I’d love to know your favorite way to enjoy pheasant. Click to enlarge images.

And the Winner Is

Recap: Tim and I each donated an original framed piece of art for the Forestry Education Auction held at the Lumberjack Dinner, 2016 Sierra Cascade Logging Conference.https://sneakingbliss.com/2016/02/10/ready-to-rumble-bliss/

Going head to head. What married couple doesn't thrive on a little friendly competition?

Going head to head. What married couple doesn’t thrive on a little friendly competition?

The auctioneer explained that bidders would bid, not knowing which piece other bidders were bidding on. The winner would have the option of buying both, each at the high bid price. If both weren’t taken, the second place bidder had the option of the “left-over” piece. If not taken then, the “left-over” would go back out on live auction.

The auctioneer brought us both to the front of the audience with our pieces and asked me to say something about my piece, but before I could answer, Tim said his piece was “…for the children.”

How do I top that? “For the children.” Really, Tim?

With that introduction, the bidding started and rapidly climbed over $2,000. This was pretty exciting. Since Tim began donating art to this auction, his pieces typically sell for $700 to $960. Clearly we were in new territory.

Soon the bidding narrowed down to two competitors, head to head.

$2,200

$2,300

back again

$2,400

The auctioneer sat Tim at one bidder table, me at the other. I knew the guy bidding at my table and taunted him to bid more, for the children of course.

Up the price went

$2,500

$2,600

SOLD for $2,700!

Then the moment of truth was revealed.

"Uncle Sam" mixed media by Tim Livingston rocked the competition, scoring $2,700 for Forestry Education.

“Uncle Sam” mixed media by Tim Livingston rocked the competition, scoring $2,700 for Forestry Education.

Tim’s “Uncle Sam” was the winning art. Both top bidders wanted Tim’s piece so, my “left-over” went back on the block for bidding.

$900

$1,000

$1,100

SOLD

$1,200

"Food Chain" watercolor by Mary A Livingston sold for $1,200 to support Forestry Education. Not bad for "left-overs."

“Food Chain” watercolor by Mary A Livingston sold for $1,200 to support Forestry Education. Not bad for “left-overs.”

Hmph. Apparently, I need to step up my game.

Tim soundly kicked my behind.

All in all, we’re pretty stoked that between both pieces of art at the live auction, and the autographed books at the silent auction our contributions brought in over $4,000 to Forestry Education.

Competitive success!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ready to Rumble Bliss

All delivered and ready for the Education Auction on Friday!

Here are the finished pieces that Tim and I donated to Sierra Cascade Logging Conference Lumberjack Dinner and Education Auction supporting forestry education. We hope this head to head, friendly “Hers vs. His” competition raises the stakes and funds brought in. There’s a lot of talking smack taking place in our house! We’ll keep you posted.

Going head to head. What married couple doesn't thrive on a little friendly competition?

Going head to head. What married couple doesn’t thrive on a little friendly competition?

"Uncle Sam" mixed media by Tim Livingston

“Uncle Sam” mixed media by Tim Livingston

"Food Chain" watercolor by Mary A Livingston

“Food Chain” watercolor by Mary A Livingston

Head to Head Bliss

For the past several years, Tim has created a piece of art for the Education Auction at the Sierra Cascade Logging Conference Education Lumberjack Dinner.

This year we’re doing something different. We’re both creating art for the auction to go head to head raising funds for forestry education.

Here are a few images of “Food Chain” as a work in progress.

I’ll save the final piece for when it’s framed.

WIP - 1 "Food Chain"

WIP – 1
“Food Chain”

Food Chain - WIP Getting some paint on paper.

Food Chain – WIP
Getting some paint on paper.

Food Chain WIP

Food Chain WIP

Food Chain WIP

Food Chain WIP

Food Chain WIP

Food Chain WIP

Food Chain WIP

Food Chain WIP

Squirrel Appreciation Day – WIP 1

WIP - 1 "Food Chain"

WIP – 1
“Food Chain”

In honor of Squirrel Appreciation Day, I’d like to share a work in progress. This year, I’m donating an original watercolor to the SCLC Lumberjack Banquet & Education Auction They raise funds for much-needed resource education programs.

I’ll keep you posted on the progress.

 

Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner

We were both hunting turkeys this Spring. There is something to be said about harvesting an animal that is perfectly capable of harvesting you.

Two carnivores hunting in the woods. There’s something to be said about harvesting an animal that is perfectly capable of harvesting you. We encountered this beautiful beast while hunting Spring turkeys. With Autumn comes a different season.

Orange Glazed Bear

bear meat cut into thin strips
soy sauce
fresh ginger
fresh garlic
ground mustard
flour of your choice for dredging (wheat, cornstarch, rice, etc.)
avocado oil
coconut oil
orange zest
barbecue sauce (homemade or one you like)
sesame seed
green onion

Marinade thin bear strips in a splash of soy sauce, fresh ginger, fresh garlic, with a pinch of ground mustard. Marinade over night or vacuum marinade for 30 minutes. The longer the better.

Place enough flour to coat the meat in a repurposed produce bag. Drain and save marinade juice from meat. Place meat in bag of flour, toss to coat.

Heat a splash almond oil with a dollop of coconut oil in a skillet over medium high heat.

Fry bear meat until crisp (avocado/coconut oil blend is excellent for this).

Add juice from marinade, barbecue sauce, and orange zest.

Simmer on low until desired tenderness. Usually 30 minutes or more. Add water if needed. Check temperature at this step.

Raise heat to caramelize sauce.
Serve over wild rice, fried bean noodles, or whatever you like.

Garnish with sesame seed and green onion.

Give thanks for the organic protein gracing your table. Enjoy.

Note: To ensure complete and safe cooking, cook to 160 degrees for 3 minutes or more. Important. ALWAYS check the temperature to ensure complete doneness.
Never skip this step when cooking bear.

Shasta Wildlife Rescue Open House 2015

Oh No! Baby-O When a dog frightens mama opossum, Baby-O flings from her mama’s back and begins an exciting adventure.

Oh No! Baby-O
When a dog frightens mama opossum, Baby-O flings from her mama’s back and begins an exciting adventure.

Our local wildlife rescue organization, Shasta Wildlife Rescue and Rehabilitation (SWRR), holds an Annual Open House and Baby Shower event at Anderson River Park, in Anderson, CA. Educational animals will be on hand and there’ll be activities for children. Tim and I will be there as well.

My first introduction to SWRR was over 20 years ago when a turkey vulture fledgling took up residence in our henhouse. A few years later I discovered a mama opossum roadkill with live babies still in her pouch along our little country road. In each instance, SWRR volunteers gathered the young and cared for them until they were able to make it on their own in the wild.

Shasta Wildlife  Rescue volunteer feeds an orphaned baby opossum.

Shasta Wildlife Rescue volunteer feeds an orphaned baby opossum.

A few years back, Karlene Stoker (SWRR volunteer), asked if I would write a story about a baby opossum. Karlene does a lot of opossum rehabilitation in her role as a volunteer. She figured if I could make turkey vultures sympathetic in No Place for Ugly Birds, then a sympathetic story about a baby opossum wouldn’t be too far of a stretch.

Thus, Oh No! Baby-O was conceived. Oh, No! Baby-O has it’s official release/birthday later this summer (August 2015). But today, there’s a special surprise at the SWRR Open House and Baby Shower. A limited number of advanced copies will go on sale as a fundraiser for SWRR! Isn’t that exciting!

So, if you’re in the area, come on by. Don’t forget your Orphaned Baby Animal Shower gift. Here’s a list.
Why bring a shower gift?
First, this is one of the ways SWRR is supported.
Second, all persons bringing gifts will be entered into a drawing for this piece of original art.

Donated original painting for Shasta Wildlife Rescue and Rehabilitation.

Baby Opossum in Dogwood Blossom – Donated original painting for Shasta Wildlife Rescue and Rehabilitation.

The drawing will be held at 1 p.m.

I hope to see you there!

Making a Splash

Sailor on the retrieve in watercolor.

Sailor on the retrieve in watercolor.